Sepsis is the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to infection that can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. In other words, it’s your body’s overactive and toxic response to an infection.

Did you know that:

  • Every day in the U.S., an average of 38 amputations are required because of sepsis?
  • As many as 87% of sepsis cases start in the community.
  • The risk of dying from sepsis increases by as much as 8% for every hour treatment is delayed.

WHO GETS SEPSIS?
While sepsis is more likely to affect very young children,
older adults, people with chronic illnesses, and those with
weakened immune systems, sepsis is an equal-opportunity
killer, affecting people of all ages and levels of health.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?
While sepsis is more likely to affect very young children,
older adults, people with chronic illnesses, and those with
weakened immune systems, sepsis is an equal-opportunity
killer, affecting people of all ages and levels of health.

T- Temperature: Higher or lower than normal
I- Infection: May have signs and symptoms of an infection
M- Mental Decline: Confused, sleepy, difficult to rouse
E- Extremely Ill: “I feel like I might die,” severe pain or discomfort

If you see a combination of these symptoms, especially
if there is a recent history of a cut, surgery, invasive
procedure, or infection, call 911 or go to a hospital.

WHAT CAUSES SEPSIS?
Sepsis is caused by an infection. The infection can be viral,
bacterial, fungal, or parasitic. It can be an infection that
started in a paper cut or bug bite, or a larger infection, like
pneumonia or meningitis. Sometimes, doctors never learn
what the infection was.

SEPSIS PREVENTION?
Sepsis can’t always be prevented, but the risk drops when
you take steps to prevent or treat infections as quickly
as possible. You can do this by staying current with
vaccinations, practicing good hygiene, and seeking
medical help when you suspect you have an infection.